Study in Atlanta, The United States



Study in Atlanta, The United States

Atlanta, Georgia, has long been known as the “capital of the American South,” and is widely praised for its unique blend of Southern tradition and 21st century glamour. Tourists from all over America and beyond converge on Atlanta to enjoy its fine restaurants, historic neighborhoods, and hiking paths–to say nothing of the world-famous Georgia Aquarium. Atlanta is also the birthplace of Coca-Cola, and fans of the world's most popular soda can learn all about it at the newly-restored Coca-Cola World exhibits downtown. Last but certainly not least, Atlanta was the hometown of Martin Luther King Jr., and a solemn monument to this seminal figure in American history takes a prominent place in Atlanta's layout.
 
The city, Georgia's largest, is relatively young even by American standards. It was founded in 1845 is the final stop on a small railway between Georgia and the Midwest. Trade and commerce brought by the railroad spurred Atlanta's rapid development, and by the time of the American Civil War (less than 20 years later) it was one of the South's most important urban centers. It had become the main transportation hub in the Confederacy, and consequently a major target for Union forces. Over the course of its short lifetime, Atlanta has been gutted twice by fires, but each time has risen from the ashes stronger and more lively city than it was before.
 
Atlanta today is among the American South's most livable cities, although years of swift expansion have created a series of problems. Unlike most cities in the developed world, where cars are steadily being replaced with public transportation, Atlanta continues to be heavily car-dependent. Walking is easy enough in downtown Atlanta, but the city is far too large to be pedestrian friendly overall, and getting around on foot is hardly a viable long-term solution. If you plan to be in Atlanta for more than a few days or weeks, it's advisable to bring the car or befriend a cab driver. Having a car is also the only away to get out into the serene wilderness areas that surround Atlanta's sprawling suburbs. The foothills of the southern Appalachian Mountains are just outside the city limits, and offer day hikes with rewarding views in addition to more challenging treks along the ridge. Without a car, there is simply no way to access the trail heads. Even without getting into the countryside, however, there are still ways to enjoy nature within Atlanta itself, as the city is famous for its tree-lined streets and verdant atmosphere.
 
After the civil rights movement and Coca-Cola, Atlanta is most famous for its educational institutions. The Georgia capital hosts no fewer than 30 institutions of higher education, many of them nationally or internationally ranked. Emory College, for example, is among America's most famous small liberal arts schools, while the Georgia Institute of Technology (usually referred to as Georgia Tech) is a leader in science and engineering. Career colleges and vocational schools are also abundant, along with opportunities for internships and apprenticeships in a wide range of fields.