Study in Munich, Germany



Study in Munich, Germany

Munich is the cultural capital of Bavaria, the southern region of Germany known for its festive hospitality, its easy-going people, and its hearty food. It has a population of more than a million, making it one of Germany’s larger cities, but it is still much smaller than, say, Berlin.
 
Munich is seen as considerably more livable than many other German cities, but it is still fairly hectic. Traffic is notoriously bad, especially during rush hour, and the many people living and working in the city can make it seem a bit crowded. Fortunately, there’s an extremely modern and high-quality system of public transportation, so there’s very little need to be on the road unless you are walking around the city center. The system combines trams, buses, and two train systems (one that covers the city itself and one that covers the surrounding suburbs and commuter towns), so you are sure to be able to find a way to get wherever you need to go. There are very cheap weekly tickets available that are perfect for students and workers who plan to be in Munich for an extended period of time, as one of these long-term cards can save you a considerable amount of money.
 
Bavarian culture is largely centered around food, and finding something good to eat is as simple as walking out your door. Bavarian dishes are usually heavy on meat, bread, and cheese. Like all of Germany, Munich is particularly fond of sausages, and sausages of all kinds can be purchased at restaurants – in fact, sometimes it can seem like every meal you buy has some sausage in it. You can also try a Munich favorite called schweinsbraten, a roast pork dish native to Bavaria. Munich also has several excellent bakeries where you can find incredibly rich chocolate cakes as well as other kinds of pastries and deserts.. With any meal, it’s of course essential to have a beer.
 
Of course, one of the most famous aspects of Munich’s culture is Oktoberfest, the annual celebration of all things Bavarian. Far more than a simple drinking festival, Oktoberfest includes delicious food of various kinds, music, dancing, and an almost overwhelming cultural experience. That said, there is also a lot of beer being served. Bavarians are famous for brewing – and drinking – beer, and Oktoberfest is the epitome of that aspect of the culture. If you’re not interested in participating in Oktoberfest, you may want to discreetly slip out of the city for a few days, as it is likely to become extremely crowded, particularly with foreign tourists drawn by the festival’s reputation.
 
Beyond Oktoberfest, there’s a huge range of activities to take part in while in Munich. The city is well known for its museums, monuments, and historic buildings, all of which are very well-preserved. Attractions range from medieval castles to galleries of modern art, museums of history and culture, and concerts that take place in venues scattered all around the town.